Friends, reunited

James and Sammy II A few Sundays ago Jay and I took a ride to the playground. He usually talks a lot in the car, about the vehicles we pass, the speed we’re going, but on this trip he was quiet. Finally, as we made the last turn to the park, he spoke. “Do you think she’ll remember me?” he asked.

By she, Jay meant Saidy, his best friend from preschool the previous year. Saidy and Jay were not fast friends. Caroline and I didn’t hear her name until December, but after that, Saidy was practically the only person Jay spoke of when we asked him each night at dinner: Who did you sit with at lunch? Who’d you play with on the playground? They were always scheming. He told us how they’d made plans to sneak out at night to the airport, with a stop at Lowes to get equipment, so they could fly and see Santa. One morning he said he needed to bring our headlamps to school, because today was the day he and Saidy were going to dig to China.

Then summer came and we were away, and in the fall, Saidy started kindergarten at a different school. Caroline and I were sad for Jay, and also worried about how he’d fare without his best friend around. But on the first day of school, Jay skipped off happily. If he wasn’t going to mention Saidy’s absence, Caroline and I weren’t, either. I did wonder, though, where a best friend lives on in the mind of a boy just stepping out into the social world.

It took a few weeks to arrange a playdate. I told Jay on a Thursday that we were going to see Saidy that weekend. A grin flashed across his face and he looked shyly toward his shoulder. It was a rare kind of expression for Jay, and I knew right away that he had not forgotten her. Each day after that he asked me how many more days until they were going to play together.

Now it was Sunday, and Saidy was late. Jay and I parked and walked onto the playground. Jay pointed to the picnic table where we’d sat last time we’d met Saidy here, and spoke of the time between then and now as though it were ages. I told Jay he could sit next to me while we waited, but he didn’t want to. Instead, he took up a position on the lowered end of a teeter-totter, and asked me, “What direction do you think she’ll come from?”

We focused on an intersection at the southwest corner of the park. A few cars rolled by. Each time, Jay strained to see if it was the right one. Finally, Saidy’s car pulled up to the stop sign, turned left, and parked, about three hundred feet across an open grassy space from where we were sitting. Jay got off the teeter-totter, walked to the edge of the playground, and stopped. “Go say hi,” I told him, and he was off.

Saidy emerged eagerly out of the back of her car, and the two of them ran fast toward each other across the grass. It was like watching a fairy tale unfold, and as they drew nearer to each other, I expected them to hug and twirl as a storm of daisies fluttered down upon them.

But that wasn’t what Jay had in mind. At the last second he cut right and looked back over his shoulder with a wicked grin. “Catch me if you can,” he seemed to say. Over the next two hours, she did.

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